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Home arrow Archives Index arrow July 1998 arrow July 1998 - English
July 1998 - English PDF Print E-mail


The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Volume 46, Number 3 - July 1998 - English

 

Editor's Note:

Hypnotic Susceptibility Order Effects in Waking Analgesia JANINE B. BRODEUR, RICHARD M. KURTZ, and MICHAEL J. STRUBE

Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C Manual and Response Booklet KENNETH S. BOWERS

Experiential Scoring for the Waterloo-Stanford Group C Scale IRVING KIRSCH, LEONARD S. MILLING, AND CHERYL BURGESS

Effects on Suggestibility of a New Method of Active-Alert Hypnosis: Alert Hand ETZEL CARDE³A, Ph.D., ANA ALARC”N, ANTONIO CAPAFONS, Ph.D., AND AGUSTђN BAYOT, Ph.D.

Intentionality during Hypnosis: An Ironic Process Analysis BRENDA J. KING AND JAMES R. COUNCIL - North Dakota State University

 

Book Reviews:

Creative Scripts for Hypnotherapy by M. E. Hunter Ericksonian Monograph No. 10. Difficult Contexts for Therapy by Stephen. R. Lankton and Jeffrey K. Zeig (Eds.)
Reviewed by PHYLLIS ALDEN

Healing the Divided Self: Clinical and Ericksonian Hypnotherapy for Post-Traumatic and Dissociative Conditions by Maggie Phillips and Claire C. Frederick
Reviewed by THOMAS F. NAGY

 

Effects on suggestibility of a new method of active-alert hypnosis: Alert hand
Etzel Cardeöa, Ph.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda Ana Alarc÷n, Antonio Capafons, Ph.D., and Agustân Bayot, Ph.D., Universitat de ValÚncia, Spain

Abstract: Research has shown that the active-alert method described by B½nyai and Hilgard (1976) produces a similar increase on suggestibility as relaxation-based techniques, but it has some limitations, including the need for a stationary bicycle and a certain level of physical fitness. We compared that method with the new "alert hand" method, which emphasizes activity and alertness, but is simpler and less strenuous. In a repeated measures, counterbalanced design (N=80), we found that: 1) the alert hand method produced significantly higher objective and subjective suggestibility scores than the active-alert technique; and 2) a high percentage (23%) of participants discontinued participation during the active-alert method, but not during the alert hand method. The alert hand method extends the benefits of active hypnosis to individuals who may have difficulties with the physical demands required by the active-alert method, and it seems to enhance suggestibility even more.

 

Hypnotic Susceptibility Order Effects in Waking Analgesia
Janine B. Brodeur, Richard M. Kurtz, and Michael J. Strube Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri

Abstract: This study reexamined Spanos, Hodgins, Stam, and Gwynn's (1984) contention that susceptibility testing order effects generated a relationship between waking analgesia pain reduction and level of hypnotic responsiveness. Undergraduate volunteers with no previous hypnosis experience were individually screened on the SHSS:C and randomly assigned to two groups. Group 1 (n=69) received a cold pressor pain protocol (baseline/waking analgesia) prior to susceptibility testing. Group 2 (n=69) received the treatment in reverse order. Our findings do not support Spanos, Hodgins, et al.'s contention that susceptibility testing order effects generate the often reported relationship between waking analgesia and level of hypnotic responsiveness. We found significant partial correlation coefficients between the SHSS:C and nonhypnotic pain reduction regardless of order of susceptibility testing. Implications about the adequacy of design-generated expectancies to explain hypnotic analgesia phenomena were examined.

 

Experiential Scoring for the Waterloo-Stanford Group C Scale
Irving Kirsch, Leonard S. Milling, and Cheryl Burgess1,2 University of Connecticut, Storrs

Abstract: A scale is presented that assesses subjective experiences associated with the test suggestions contained in the Waterloo-Stanford Group C scale, a group adaptation of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C. This scale, along with the standard behavioral scoring system of the WSGC, was given to 926 students at the University of Connecticut. Normative data from this sample indicate that the experiential scoring scale is both reliable and valid as a measure of suggestibility. It is suggested that it may be useful to supplement behavioral scoring with experiential scoring when the WSGC is used.

 

Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C Manual and Response Booklet
Kenneth S. Bowers University of Waterloo

Abstract: The manual and response booklet for the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C (WSGC) is presented. The WSGC is a group adaptation of the individually administered Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C; Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1962).

 

Intentionality during Hypnosis: An Ironic Process Analysis
BRENDA J. KING AND JAMES R. COUNCIL - North Dakota State University

Abstract: Two studies were completed to test whether responding to hypnotic suggestions requires intentional effort. Hypnotic suggestions for amnesia were used as an analog of thought suppression and Wegner's (1994) model of ironic processing was applied to hypnotic responding. In the first study, participants were required to maintain suggested amnesia while performing a cancellation task with and without a cognitive load. The second study required suppression of thoughts of a favorite car, once with "blank mind" instructions and then with a suggestion for amnesia. The results of these studies indicate that dissociated control theory (Bowers, 1994) provides the best explanation for hypnotic responding in one subset of highly hypnotizable participants, while more intentional responding provides the best explanation for others. 

 
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