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Home arrow Archives Index arrow April 2002 arrow April 2002 - English
April 2002 - English PDF Print E-mail

 

The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Volume 50, Number 2 - April 2002 - English

 

How Practitioners Can Make Scientifically Viable Contributions to Clinical Outcome Research: The Single-Case Time-Series Design
Jeffrey J. Borckardt and Michael R. Nash

Although clinicians typically possess considerable interest in research, especially about which interventions do and do not work, all too often they dismiss the notion that they themselves can make viable scientific contributions to the outcome literature. This derives from an unfortunate assumption that the only true experiment is a between-groups experiment. There is another form of true experiment that is perfectly compatible with real-world clinical practice: the single-case time-series design. Intensive and systematic tracking of one or a few patients over time can yield viable inferences about efficacy, effectiveness, and, under some circumstances, mechanisms of change. This paper describes how clinicians working with hypnosis can carry out such research. The rationale and essential features of time-series studies are outlined; each design is illustrated with actual studies from the hypnosis literature, and new methods of statistical analysis, well within the statistical competence of practitioners, are described.

 

The Efficacy of Hypnosis in the Treatment of Pruritus in People with HIV/AIDS: A Time-Series Analysis
Julia J. Rucklidge and Douglas Saunders

Pruritus, or generalized itch, is a source of serious discomfort and distress in a significant minority of people living with AIDS. Anecdotal reports suggest hypnosis might be a useful treatment, leading to reductions in distress and improvements in the condition. But empirical examination of the question is notably lacking. This time-series study reports results of a 6-session self-hypnosis treatment (relaxation, deepening, imagery, and home practice) for 3 HIV-positive men suffering from pruritus, related to disease progression and/or HIV medications. Posttreatment, all 3 patients reported significant reductions in daily itch severity and extent of sleep disturbance due to itch. One patient also evidenced significantly less itch distress. Another also experienced significantly less time bothered by itch. For the 2 patients on which 4-month follow-up data was available, treatment benefit across variables was stable or further improved.

 

Hypnosis for the Control of HIV/AIDS-Related Pain
Mark Christopher Langenfeld, Ennio Cipani, and Jeffrey J. Borckardt

This intensive case study used an A-B time-series analysis design to examine whether 5 adult patients with various AIDS-related pain symptoms benefited from a hypnosis-based pain management approach. The three dependent variables in this study were: (a) self-ratings of the severity of pain, (b) self-ratings of the percentage of time spent in pain, and (c) amount of PRN pain medication taken. Data were collected over a period of 12 weeks, including a 1-week baseline period and an 11-week treatment period. Autoregressive integrated moving-average (ARIMA) models were used to determine the effects of the hypnotic intervention over and above autoregressive components in the data. All 5 patients showed significant improvement on at least one of the three dependent variables as a result of the hypnotic intervention. Four of the 5 patients reported using significantly less pain medication during the treatment phase.

 

A Case Study Examining the Efficacy of a Multimodal Psychotherapeutic Intervention for Hypertension
Jeffrey J. Borckardt

This study examines the effectiveness of a multimodal psychotherapeutic approach using hypnosis in the treatment of a single case of hypertension. A systematic eclectic conceptualization and treatment approach was implemented using psychodynamic, behavioral, and cognitive-behavioral elements. Hypnosis was used to support each of the treatment modalities. Time-series analysis procedures indicate that the psychological interventions were associated with significantly reduced diastolic blood pressure. Additionally, the effect of the psychological interventions was significant over and above traditional pharmacological interventions. However, psychotherapeutic interventions had no substantial impact on systolic pressure. The flexibility of hypnosis as a therapeutic tool is discussed in terms of potential advantages in treatment. 

 
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