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January 2001 - English PDF Print E-mail


The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Volume 49, Number 1 - January 2001 - English

 

Hypnosis therapy of phantom limb pain - evaluated using PET
Gunnar RosЋn, Frode Willoch, Peter Bartenstein, Niels Berner and Sigmund R¿sj¿

Abstract: In a pilot study with 2 patients suffering from phantom limb pain (PLP), hypnotic suggestions were used to modify and control the experience of the phantom limb, and positron emission tomography (PET) was used to index underlying pathways and areas involved in the processing of phantom limb experience (PLE) and PLP. The patients' subjective experiences of pain were recorded in a semistructured questionnaire. PET results demonstrated activation in areas known to be responsible for sensory and motor processing. The reported subjective experiences of PLP and movement corresponded with predicted brain activity patterns. This work helps to clarify the central nervous system correlates of phantom limb sensations, including pain. It further suggests that hypnosis can be incorporated into treatment protocols for phantom limb pain.

 

Phenomenological Experiences Associated with Hypnotic Susceptibility
Katalin Varga, Emese J—zsa, ƒva I. B‡nyai, Anna C. Gšsi-Greguss, & V. Krishna Kumar

Abstract: Following the administration of a Hungarian translation of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C), 104 Hungarian subjects completed the Hungarian translation of the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory (PCI). Subjects had also been administered the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) about 1 week to 2 months before the SHSS:C. The pattern of correlations between hypnotizability (as measured by the HGSHS:A and the SHSS:C) and the 5 factors of the PCI was quite similar to that of previous work carried out using the English language versions on subjects in the United States. SHSS:C and HGSHS:A scores correlated significantly with the PCI factors of dissociated control, positive affect, and attention to internal processes factors. Additionally, the SHSS:C score correlated significantly with the visual imagery factor, as found in previous work.

 

Lumbar puncture hypnosis: Controlling procedural distress in dementia patients
Eric P. Simon and Monique M. Canonico

Abstract: Lumbar punctures are often vital to the medical management of patients with suspected organic pathology, yet they are commonly met with such distress that medical risk is significantly increased, and patient rapport is significantly decreased, further compromising medical treatment. Although the use of hypnosis for lumbar punctures is well established in pediatric patients, no literature exists for adult patients. Similarly, there is no extant research regarding hypnosis for dementia patients, likely due to the limiting factors of impaired attention and concentration. With these factors in mind, a method for incorporating hypnosis into a lumbar puncture procedure is described for a needle-phobic adult patient suffering from dementia.

 

Anxiolytic and metabolic outcomes of hypnosis, autogenic relaxation, and quiet rest
Ann Wertz Garvin, Malani R. Trine, and William P. Morgan

Abstract: The present study examined the influence of hypnosis, autogenic relaxation, and quiet rest on selected affective states and metabolism. The influence of body position (seated vs. supine) on these same outcome measures was also investigated. Anxiety, tension, and overall mood were assessed before and 30 minutes after each treatment, and oxygen uptake was measured continuously. State anxiety, tension, and a general measure of mood were reduced significantly following each intervention, but oxygen uptake did not change with the exception of small, transient alterations during the physical challenges performed in the hypnosis condition. It is concluded that administration of a routine hypnosis induction to healthy individuals results in a reduction of state anxiety and an improvement of mood commensurate with effects achieved by autogenic training and quiet rest, and these effects occur in both the supine and seated position.

 

Is a capacity for negative priming correlated with hypnotizability?: A preliminary study
Daniel David, Brenda King, and Jeffrey Borckardt

Abstract: Hypnotic responsiveness may depend upon the ability to inhibit the irrelevant stimuli that evoke responses that are incompatible with current goals (or the mapping between an irrelevant/disruptive stimulus and its response) in order to actively maintain task-relevant information. In a simple correlation design, the authors investigated the relationship between cognitive inhibition (negative priming) and hypnotic responsiveness. A statistically significant correlation was obtained between the extent of negative priming (measured in time latency) and hypnotic responsiveness (r = .491). Limitations of this preliminary study and implications for future work are discussed.

 
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