The Effect of a Hypnotic-Based Animated Video on Stress and Pain Reduction in Pediatric Surgery

Presurgical stress and its negative influences on postsurgical recovery and pain are well documented in the medical literature. Hence, the reduction of stress is advisable. The present study aimed to reduce stress using a hypnotic-based animated video. Thirty children aged 3 to 16 years hospitalized for ambulatory surgery for undescended testes or umbilical/inguinal hernia were recruited for the study. They watched the video 1 time prior to surgery in the presence of their parents and reported their anxiety and pain pre- and post video watching on a visual analogue scale. The results show a statistically significant reduction in both anxiety and pain. The article describes the structuring of the animated video and includes links to English, Hebrew, and Arabic versions of it.

Efficacy of Self-hypnosis on Quality of Life For Children with Chronic Pain Syndrome

The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of self-hypnosis in a therapeutic education program (TEP) for the management of chronic pain in 26 children aged 7 to 17 years. Outcomes of the study were a total or a partial (at least 1) achievement of the therapeutic goals (pain, quality of sleeping, schooling, and functional activity). Sixteen patients decreased their pain intensity, 10 reached all of their therapeutic goals, and 9 reached them partially. Self-hypnosis was the only component of the TEP associated with these improvements. The current study supports the efficacy of self-hypnosis in our TEP program for chronic pain management in children.

Use of Hypnotic Techniques in Children and Adolescents With Chronic Pain: Do the Ages of Patients or Years of Practice and Theoretical Orientation of Clinicians Matter?

Hypnosis is known to be effective in the treatment of pediatric pain. To better understand which strategies might be most useful, more knowledge is needed regarding the strategies that are actually used by experienced clinicians and the factors that influence their use. To address this knowledge gap, 35 health care professionals completed an online survey on the use of hypnosis in the management of pediatric chronic pain. The findings indicate that clinicians vary their use of hypnotic strategies primarily as a function of a patient’s age but not as a function of theoretical orientation or amount of experience. The findings may be useful for guiding clinicians in their selection of strategies and suggestions when working with children with pain.