The Effect of a Hypnotic-Based Animated Video on Stress and Pain Reduction in Pediatric Surgery

Presurgical stress and its negative influences on postsurgical recovery and pain are well documented in the medical literature. Hence, the reduction of stress is advisable. The present study aimed to reduce stress using a hypnotic-based animated video. Thirty children aged 3 to 16 years hospitalized for ambulatory surgery for undescended testes or umbilical/inguinal hernia were recruited for the study. They watched the video 1 time prior to surgery in the presence of their parents and reported their anxiety and pain pre- and post video watching on a visual analogue scale. The results show a statistically significant reduction in both anxiety and pain. The article describes the structuring of the animated video and includes links to English, Hebrew, and Arabic versions of it.

Effectiveness of Self-Hypnosis on the Relief of Experimental Dental Pain: A Randomized Trial

This randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluates the effectiveness of self-hypnosis on pain perception. Pain thresholds were measured, and a targeted, standardized pain stimulus was created by electrical stimulation of the dental pulp of an upper anterior tooth. Pain stimulus was rated by a visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain threshold under self-hypnosis was higher (57.1 ± 17.1) than without hypnotic intervention (39.5 ± 11.8) (p < .001). Pain was rated lower on the VAS with self-hypnosis (4.0 ± 3.8) than in the basal condition without self-hypnosis (7.1 ± 2.7) (p < .001). Self-hypnosis can be used in clinical practice as an adjunct to the gold standard of local anesthesia for pain management, as well as an alternative in individual cases.